Peyton Manning, NFL


Peyton Manning set to announce retirement

After a record-breaking 18-year career, Peyton Manning is prepared to step away from the NFL.

News of Manning's planned retirement broke Sunday and the Broncos have scheduled a press conference for Monday at 11 a.m. Mountain time where the announcement is expected to be made official.

Manning wrapped up his second Super Bowl title in February, leading the Denver Broncos to a 24-10 win over the Carolina Panthers. Manning has previously led the Indianapolis Colts to a 29-17 win over the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XLI.

Statistically, Manning retires as the NFL's best quarterback. He holds the single-season and career record for most passing yards and passing touchdowns and is tied for the single-game touchdown record. He also won a record five MVP awards from The Associated Press and has the most wins by any quarterback in NFL history.

He was the first to defeat 31 NFL teams and only he and Brett Favre have defeated all 32 NFL teams.

His retirement comes at the end of the worst season of his career. Manning was injury-prone and missed six games while throwing for 2,249 yards and nine touchdowns - both career-lows. It was one of only three seasons where he didn't throw for at least 4,000 yards and the only one with fewer than 26 touchdowns.

Manning did, however, miss the entire 2011 season with a neck injury. He was released by the Colts following that season and signed with the Broncos. His second season in Denver proved to be the best statistical year in NFL history when he threw for 5,477 yards and 55 touchdowns - both records - but the Broncos lost to the Seattle Seahawks in the Super Bowl.

Manning was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts in 1998 after a stellar four-year career at the University of Tennessee.

He had been expected to follow in the footsteps of his father, Archie Manning, by attending Ole Miss, but instead chose to play for the Volunteers where he set numerous college records. He turned down the opportunity to leave for the NFL early and completed all four years of his eligibility at Tennessee.

During Manning's senior year, Tennessee won its only SEC championship in his tenure and he finished as runner-up for the Heisman Trophy behind Charles Woodson, the only primarily defensive player to win the award.

Manning career was dogged by a reputation that he couldn't win the "big one." While at Florida, he lost to SEC East rival Florida all four years.

The Volunteers also lost to Nebraska in the Orange Bowl Manning's senior year while vying for the national championship. Nebraska split the championship that year with Michigan.

That stigma followed Manning to the NFL where he struggled in the playoffs and lost several high-profile games. Manning's career playoff record was 14-13, just edging over .500 with this year's Super Bowl victory.

His first Super Bowl win had the same effect on his playoff record, boosting it to 7-6 at the time.

In Manning's last year, he was dogged by two scandals. A report from Al Jazeera America alleged Manning's wife received shipments of human growth hormone at the same time he was recovering from neck surgery.

Manning denied that he had used anything inappropriate and decried the report as violating his wife's medical privacy.

A previous allegation of a sexual assault against a female trainer while at Tennessee also resurfaced amid the HGH questions and retirement speculation.

Throughout Manning's career, he was known as much for his many commercial endorsements as for his play on the field. Making good use of his celebrity status, Manning appeared in many, often humorous, ads for products such as Papa John's pizza, Nationwide Insurance, DirecTV, MasterCard, Sprint and the United Way.

He also famously plugged Budweiser during his Super Bowl victory speech in February. Manning owns a share in Budweiser distribution facilities, but both he and the company denied it was a paid endorsement.

His knack for comedy was also put to use as host of Saturday Night Live.

Manning also founded the Peyback Foundation, which supported charitable causes and community projects in all the places he has lived and worked - New Orleans, Tennessee, Indianapolis and Denver. St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis named its children's wing after Manning because of his involvement and donations to the medical center.

Owing to his personality and popularity, it has been long speculated that Manning's retirement will follow the same path as many other famous athletes by taking a broadcasting job.

Several reports have indicated that all the networks that broadcast NFL games are interested in bringing him to either their pregame studio shows or in-game coverage. It's also been speculated that teams would be interested in him as a coach or for a management position.

Copyright 2016 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.


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